Updated: Taking A Workshop

Hello everyone. Just to let you know, this post will be ridiculously short. I am letting everyone know that I am taking a writer’s workshop, and joined a writer’s group, on Facebook, called the Plotting Workshop, and the Ninja Writers, respectively. It was started by the woman that I got the idea for the plot board from, Shaunta Grimes Alburger. It’s been interesting so far. I’ll do another post later, with more information. If you’re interested in joining me, look it up.

I’m adding a link for a contest for the workshop. If you click on the link, I get more entries for a chance to win free entry into a full writing course. If you click it, you will also be enrolled in the Plotting Workshop for free. If you’re interested, please click the link below.

http://www.whatisaplot.com/giveaways/a-novel-idea-giveaway/?lucky=40

 

Advertisements

How to Start Your Novel

4bfa6297195a8929ff6f3a8a6d7fbe56

 

I love to read.

I have easily read hundreds of books, not that I have actually counted. I have read great books, good books, decent books, okay books, and have even tried to tough out reading terrible books.

I, like a lot of readers, can usually tell if we want to keep reading a book by the end of the first page, usually even sooner than that.

A reader’s time is limited, and precious, if they cannot get past that first page, why in the world would they want to risk wasting any more time on your book, when there are thousands upon thousands of other books they can be reading?

It does not matter how amazing you think your story is, if you cannot hook your reader on the first page -not just the first page, but the first sentence.

That is where we will be starting. At the beginning.

If you want to draw in a reader, and ultimately a publisher so that your story will even get out to readers, you need a great first sentence. A hook. Something that will grab their attention so that they keep reading, and don’t want to stop.

A hook should invoke curiosity, why is this happening? Why is the person, or people, in this position? A good hook will make people want to keep reading to have those questions, or others like them, answered.

A hook should also present conflict, what will happen because of what was introduced in the hook?

It should also be an introduction for the action to come. Things should flow smoothly from there. If you have a great hook, you do not want the action to drop off after that. The suspense should only build higher from this point.

Below I have compiled some of the most well known hooks. Why are the well known? Why do they such a good job hooking the reader?

The Man in Black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed. -Stephen King, The Gunslinger

  •  This hook invokes curiosity. Why is the Man in Black fleeing? Why is the Gunslinger  following? Who is the Man in Black? Who is the Gunslinger?
  • There is conflict. What will happen once the Gunslinger catches the Man in Black?
  • The hook itself already has action: fled, followed, but there is a lot of potential for more. Where is the Man in Black going?

In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.  – J.R.R. Tolkein, The Hobbit

  • What is a hobbit?
  • Why is he/she in a hole?
  • What will happen when a hobbit leaves their hole?

It was a pleasure to burn. -Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

  • Why is something burning?
  • What is a pleasure to burn?
  • What will happen after the fire goes out?

The three hooks above are three well known lines, and there are so many more examples out there, that I could continue making posts just about them, but I don’t have that much time or patience.

So, if you’re writing a novel, do you have your hook?

What are some of your favorite hooks? Why do they work so well? Share below!

Leave me your thoughts, opinions, questions, what have you, below. I love to hear from you guys.

My Plot Board 3

So, I’ve done as much as I can for now, but I wouldn’t call it finished. Things will probably get shifted, added, and removed as I actually write. How it is now will act as a road map, keeping me on track. Now I can really get writing again, and I am so excited.

image

In my next post, I will be introducing my main character. So, look out for that.

Has anyone else started/been plotting? How’s it going?

Don’t forget to like, and comment below. I love hearing from you guys.

Sub-Plots

For this post, I am taking the time to mention sub-plot. Below is a couple of links about sub-plot, and why it is important.

http://writerswrite.co.za/the-subplot-not-second-place-but-side-by-side

The link above gives some good reasons as to why sub-plots are a good idea to add to your novel.

https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/writers/advice/450/a-writers-toolkit/story-and-plot/

The above article also explains why sub-plots are a good addition to your novel.

I am currently working out the sub-plots for my novel on my plot board. So far, I have two, and I think they’ll add enough to the story, not to need more.

I am doing my best to make sure that the sub-plots add to the main plot, help move it along, without feeling out of place, or forced. It’s a delicate balance, but I think I have it figured out.

If you’re writing a story, or have written a story, will/did you have sub-plots?

Do you feel they are important?

Don’t hesitate to let me know what you guys think. I will always do my best to respond.